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Wednesday, 21 April 2010

2 metres of reading to do

Haven't been blogging for a bit - way too busy on the festival. It's been fairly full on since January, but we've just about got this year's program of writers sorted, the program copy is with the printer and all I have to do now is a bit of reading - well, a lot actually - that pile I'm holding is about a third of it.

This is the reason that I've spent the last few (unpaid) months of my life putting the festival together - the trade off. A mountain of books by festival authors has arrived and I couldn't be more delighted by the prospect of having to curl up in the cool rainy weather we're having with a cup of tea, uggies on tooters and a pile of essential reading.

I grew up in one of those protestant work ethic households where reading was considered to be a waste of valuable time. I never saw my parents read a book. Homework was OK, but not reading for pleasure . The idea of having a job that required me to read was incomprehensible to my father.

Even now I still have the nagging feeling of being a wastrel when I pick up a book rather than go outside to do some 'real' work. Those childhood experiences go in deep, but not deep enough to counter the excitement of opening a new book, in mint condition, all shiny and crisp and chock full of ideas. So far, I've read 2 memoirs by poets written in some of the most beautiful prose imaginable, a brilliant history, the story of an ex-Qld cop, a book about the science of the mind and consciousness, a brick of a biography and a bit of cool pop science.

Only another two metres to go.

The festival program will be up on line soon. Go check out the festival site and follow it if you don't already.

20 comments:

  1. That is such a pretty picture of you!

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  2. I want to come along! Sounds like so much fun. Maybe towards the end - we have our Impro Festival the weekend of the 24th.

    Have fun with your reading - sounds so cosy!

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  3. Why thank you Jen. Not bad for 50 eh? Burger lite must be working.

    GC - there is a workshop you should definitely consider to be run by the resident director of the STC. It's on the second weekend (JB's weekend).

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  4. Wow, reading as wasting time? I figure all the writers you helped get published is a suitable revenge

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  5. You think you had problems! My Exclusive Brethren mob almost had apoplexy when my (athiest) aunt gave me the Complete Works of Shakespeare at about 14 and I read the lot, eventually absorbing his dialect and his atheist ideas. Their attitude was that reading time was better spent praying (if there was no wood to cut) and I share your niggling guilt. In fact, I often have a little cry when I allow myself a little kindness. Yes Barnesm, perfect revenge! Go Hughsey!

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  6. One of my mothers few good points was instilling me with an enjoyment of reading and my father was all for it.

    Shame you won't be around for Chaz Day, Hughsey but I know it's a long trip, and we don't have a window to come up to see you guys.

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  7. Our best "reading is suspicious" story: My husband was born with holes in the heart which, at that time, couldn't be fixed. His mother was warned to watch him carefully, as he wouldn't have a strong constitution. Theirs was not a bookish family by any means, but from an early age my husband loved books. Whenever he would spend too long reading, his Mum would make him stop and send him outdoors to run, ride his bike and climb trees. She believed reading, which was such hard work for her, was obviously too arduous a pastime for a boy with a weak heart! (Postscript: two open-heart surgeries later, we just celebrated my husband's 81st birthday. His presents? Books, of course!)

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  8. Being a guy who can see better than he can think, I reckon you're looking hot Hughesy.

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  9. There is a whole cohort of thirty to forty somethings who actually think that if you are reading, you must be depressed! My friend Therese is a big reader and accused of it constantly by her well meaning friends.

    Thanks Bedak, come the revolution, you get to live.

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  10. Maybe so, but I'll be chaining him to the hills hoist and fitting him with a restraining collar, just the same.

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  11. What was I thinking?
    Or course Commandant Quokka, you will be in charge of security - come the revolution.

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  12. Being a kindly soul, I will of course give him shade, water, and a chew toy.

    It might be something I've chewed on first but so long as he's had his shots I'm sure he won't catch anything.

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  13. How far have you got ? 1m 20 ? less?
    How many have been thrown across a room ?

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  14. And, are you North Coasters planning to come down to Brisvegas for the Havock Fiasco?

    I haven't checked in at his blog for a few days but I think we'd settled on lunch at Fiasco's Steakhouse at the Morrisson Hotel, Sat 15 May 1pm.

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  15. Hmmm - could be a possible. You going NB?

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  16. If it's easier, we're also planning a run to Redcliffe on Sunday 16th to have lunch with big bad Al. Not sure where, I've offered suggestions over at Faffquarters HQ i.e. Cheeseburger.

    As Commander Havock's jet takes off at 3.55pm, I think we will have to exit the peninsula between 2.30 and 3pm so that he gets checked in on time.

    I'm hoping to get him to Redcliffe by 12noon at the very latest so he gets a decent visit in. Hopefully earlier but you know what it's like organizing MEN.



    I'm hoping to get him to Redcliffe by 12pm at the latest.

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  17. Is there an echo here or have I inhaled too much windex?

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  18. Mr. Boylan ... no offense meant ... but you are an attorney and it is a given that you say very few things honestly.

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  19. Rog, I am so glad that SOMEONE here understands me.

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