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Sunday, 13 September 2009

SATAN is back!



Satan is back on duty - thank god!

The mice have figured out every single device we could come up with to catch them, so Satan's return is just in time to prevent a plague of the little bastards. They were so thick and blase this year that G-man was able to catch one behind the curtain with his bare hand.

Satan has taken up a top spot under a bench on the verandah, coiled up against the glass. He must have shed recently (they like to do it on the dry wood of the verandah or the rafters under the house) because his exquisite skin is bright, shimmering iridescent green, blue and copper. Being able to get up that close to him on the other side of the glass is amazing - his whole body is one long sinuous jeweled and tooled work of beauty.

We've had the long dry days and cool nights, jasmine, wattle and citrus blossom, but it's not really spring until Satan is back, curled up like a cat in the sunny patch on the verandah.




14 comments:

  1. Beautiful snake. Diamond python? Or is it an Amethyst python?

    He won't fix your mouse problem entirely - he doesn't have enough appetite. Nevertheless, they're wonderful creatures to have around the house, and they definitely keep the rats on their toes.

    I suspect he's probably fond of the odd guinea-fowl snack, though!

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  2. yeah we wont be telling jane about this if you ever want to see her visit again.

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  3. Gees I wish our python would go for the rats. Oh that's right we don't have any. Well none that the cat doesn't bring in already and shouldn't because they are native rats. The Bloke thinks that 40,000 years in residence is not enough to make them truly native. Apparently they didn't 'evolve' here. They were 'introduced' by (aboriginal) humans. The excuses he makes for our Wes. And he originally a cat hater! Our python lives in our eaves and has a lorikeet a week. Everyone has to eat I guess.

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  4. What a beautiful animal. And a working snake, too. I am so impressed I won't make my usual comments about how delicious they can be if cooke properly

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  5. nicer than the bastards we get down here. Bedes

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  6. Oh, we get bastards here too - eastern browns mainly, but if you have pythons, they tend to out class the browns at hunting and so we don't get many round the house.

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  7. Shame you couldn't tame the feral cat as then between it and the snake you'd have your rodent problem licked.

    Great pics btw, isn't he sweet?

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  8. Creepy and cool at the same time. Haven't seen any snakes in my nine months in Australia so far but always on the look out. Got over a fear of them after our time in Costa Rica which was crawling with them:)

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  9. From one herpephile to another, I hope you don't mind my awarding you one of those damned blogging awards . . . have a look if you like.

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  10. I'm struggling to NOT suggest ya CAP the FKR and make boots..nice, but sure as shit not for me..only good one is a ...well, I wont go there as he is ya pet.

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  11. Beautiful snake. We've got heaps at the moment - but just brown and green tree snakes (a lot smaller). Would they ever go for your chickens? My chooks freerange all day but I reckon they'd be too big for the snakes - who I assume are after mice, rats or the odd egg even. I've ordered your book - I'm sure snakes get a mention in it - but in the meantime, I've got chickens to worry about.

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  12. He has had a go at the chooks, but his eyes are bigger than his belly. Fond of the odd egg though. They like to sit in the laying box - fielding in slips I call it.

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  13. 'Fielding in slips' - ha,ha,ha - but not really funny if you are a chook with a load to get through your cloaca.

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